BARRINGTON — Terrell Brown’s sizeable basketball potential is now coming to fruition and the basketball world is taking notice.

BARRINGTON — Terrell Brown’s sizeable basketball potential is now coming to fruition and the basketball world is taking notice.

Brown, a 6-foot-9 forward from East Providence, is a well-groomed hoop prospect. Taking a lead from his grandfather, former University of Rhode Island forward Vic Soares, Brown has hit all the right spots on a pathway to a Division I scholarship. He’s played on high-end AAU teams for three years with the Boston Amateur Basketball Club and enjoyed two stints training with the best players in the country for USA Basketball in Colorado.

More importantly, he’s faced a slew of talent every day for the last two seasons on loaded teams at St. Andrew’s and is seen as one of the best high school juniors in the East. Brown was an invited guest at Midnight Madness festivities at both URI and Providence College last week, and schools like Xavier, Boston College, Minnesota and Iowa State are actively recruiting the 16-year old junior big man.

“It’s exciting but it’s been a lot of hard work. I know I’m getting better and I just want to show what I can do this year,” Brown said before a recent BABC game.

Probably the best way to put Brown’s rise into perspective is that so many college coaches are intrigued by a player who’s still waiting to be a regular on his own team. Brown is the rare prospect who hasn’t repeated a grade or hopped schools to bolster his athletic profile. He has no advisors or “people,” according to St. Andrew’s coach Mike Hart, who credits the job Brown’s family has done raising him.

Because he only turned 16 last summer, Brown has yet to be a regular for BABC’s top team and he sat behind nine seniors on last year’s St. Andrew’s team. That said, plenty of scouts left Saints games asking about the tall, thin sophomore who showed a nice shooting touch in his limited minutes.

“Terrell played behind some very good players last year,” said Hart, noting that his top big man (Bonzie Colson) is now at Notre Dame. “He’s had an excellent fall with AAU, and for the coaches who have come to our open gym runs. This is the year I think he’ll remove the word potential from next to his name.”

Brown says that sitting and doing a lot of watching the last two years at St. Andrew’s “was real frustrating. I had Bonzie and Henry (Bolton, who is now at Utah State) leading in my freshman and sophomore year. Now it’s me. I’ll be ready for it.”

Brown was one of 32 players invited to attend training camp in July for the USA Under-17 national team. He did not make a cut to the team’s 12 finalists but was one of only six 16-year-olds in camp.

“No one really saw him on our ninth- and 10th-grade team, but a lot of coaches were at the USA Basketball tryout and Terrell acquitted himself well there,” said Leo Papile, the legendary coach/founder of the BABC and former chief scout for the Boston Celtic. “The intriguing thing about him is not only his size and length and shooting touch, but his age. He’s gained 40 pounds with us in two years and he’s not a man yet.”

Brown said he now weighs 207 pounds after training at St. Andrew’s and with his grandfather, who now works as a guard with the R.I. Dept. of Corrections. Where Brown was previously content to stand on the perimeter and shoot over guards, he says he’s now more comfortable working inside as well.

“I’m getting to be more of a post player and I think I’m really a face-up four (forward),’ he said. “On defense, I think I can guard fours and threes.”

The added size and strength should help overcome a knock on Brown that he’s not as aggressive as scouts would like. Papile says he pushes Brown to rebound more consistently, “but all the markers are pointing in the proper direction with him.”

Hart says that Brown and 6-9 transfer Duncan Ozburn are the biggest players on his roster, and work Brown has done with assistant coach John O’Shea on post play has gone well. “Terrell can coast at times, but he’s running harder and working harder than ever before. If he’s playing hard, he’s not coming out of the game for us,” Hart said.

Brown says he’s “very interested” in both URI and PC but is clearly intrigued by interest from other schools, too. Hart has sent 19 of his players to Division I colleges but he’s never had a homegrown big man.

“I think he could still grow to about seven feet, and Rhode Island hasn’t had a big player at a high school in our state in a long time,” said Hart. “It’s a nice treat for our state and it couldn’t happen to a nicer young man.”